Hellenic heritage, a quest for knowledge, and a heart for God and traveling.
travelsofabrokegirl:

Double the exposure, double the fun! 
French Alps, 2014

travelsofabrokegirl:

Double the exposure, double the fun!

French Alps, 2014

(via enricosarti)

earth-song:

by Ivan Kislov

earth-song:

by Ivan Kislov

earth-song:

Tarangire National Park, Tanzania by Nate Zeman

earth-song:

Tarangire National Park, Tanzania by Nate Zeman

ellliot:

gnostic-forest:

emkaymlp:

mj-the-scientist:

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.
Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

Why does this not have more notes?!?
YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET
If you don’t think that’s the tightest shit, you can get out of my face.

i wanted to reblog this so that everyone who sees it can realize just how amazing this is. you are looking at a photograph taken on an entirely different planet. an entire world that has been completely untouched by humanity until only recently. no human in the history of mankind has ever look at those rocks, the soil, the mountains, and the sky until now. and until we finally manage to set foot there for the very first time, no human has ever seen mars from this perspective with their own two eyes or feel the texture of the martian soil on the bottom of their boots. this was only possible by creating a robot, an actual robot, and shooting way out of the reaches of earth and with extremely careful calculations, have it safely land and deploy right where they want it. it’s a robot on another planet being controlled 225 million kilometers away, seeing and studying and sending information for us.
this is the sort of thing you would see in science fiction movies that are only a few decades old. what was only imagination and possibilities back then is now all in this photograph. im looking forward to see what happens in the coming decades

I’m so infatuated by this. 

225 million kilometers away and we got it on film that blows my mind

ellliot:

gnostic-forest:

emkaymlp:

mj-the-scientist:

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.

Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

Why does this not have more notes?!?

YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET

If you don’t think that’s the tightest shit, you can get out of my face.

i wanted to reblog this so that everyone who sees it can realize just how amazing this is. you are looking at a photograph taken on an entirely different planet. an entire world that has been completely untouched by humanity until only recently. no human in the history of mankind has ever look at those rocks, the soil, the mountains, and the sky until now. and until we finally manage to set foot there for the very first time, no human has ever seen mars from this perspective with their own two eyes or feel the texture of the martian soil on the bottom of their boots. this was only possible by creating a robot, an actual robot, and shooting way out of the reaches of earth and with extremely careful calculations, have it safely land and deploy right where they want it. it’s a robot on another planet being controlled 225 million kilometers away, seeing and studying and sending information for us.

this is the sort of thing you would see in science fiction movies that are only a few decades old. what was only imagination and possibilities back then is now all in this photograph. im looking forward to see what happens in the coming decades

I’m so infatuated by this. 

225 million kilometers away and we got it on film that blows my mind

(via 120bears)

(Source: forgottenships, via macadameia)

if i took a shot for every time you crossed my mind i’d end up dying from alcohol poisoning
by bzq (via x69o)

(via 120bears)

ancientpeoples:

Limestone ostracon with a sketch of a pharaoh spearing a lion
14cm high and 12.5 cm wide (5.5 x 4 15/16 inch.)
Egyptian, New Kingdom, Ramesside Period, dynasty 20, 1186 - 1070 BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Limestone ostracon with a sketch of a pharaoh spearing a lion

14cm high and 12.5 cm wide (5.5 x 4 15/16 inch.)

Egyptian, New Kingdom, Ramesside Period, dynasty 20, 1186 - 1070 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Colossal marble head of Asklepios
Greek
c. 325-300 BCFound on Mílos, Southern Aegean, Greece
The healing god
This head comes from a colossal statue of the god Asklepios, a god of medicine and healing. It was constructed from three separately worked pieces, of which two survive. The calm expression of the face is set off by a full beard and crown of hair. The lead pegs that would have held a gold wreath are still in place, but the wreath is now lost.
The cult of Asklepios was popular throughout Greece and Asia Minor during the Classical period (480-300 BC) and the Hellenistic period (323-30 BC). Important centres were set up in Athens and at Epidaurus in the Peloponnese. Hippocrates was the founding father of modern scientific medicine and, following his death in 357 BC, a healing sanctuary was established on his native island of Cos. There, Asklepios was represented in what became the canonical manner of the later Hellenistic and Roman periods: bearded, semi-nude and supported on one side by a staff around which a serpent is coiled. This head probably comes from such a statue.
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Colossal marble head of Asklepios

Greek

c. 325-300 BC
Found on Mílos, Southern Aegean, Greece

The healing god

This head comes from a colossal statue of the god Asklepios, a god of medicine and healing. It was constructed from three separately worked pieces, of which two survive. The calm expression of the face is set off by a full beard and crown of hair. The lead pegs that would have held a gold wreath are still in place, but the wreath is now lost.

The cult of Asklepios was popular throughout Greece and Asia Minor during the Classical period (480-300 BC) and the Hellenistic period (323-30 BC). Important centres were set up in Athens and at Epidaurus in the Peloponnese. Hippocrates was the founding father of modern scientific medicine and, following his death in 357 BC, a healing sanctuary was established on his native island of Cos. There, Asklepios was represented in what became the canonical manner of the later Hellenistic and Roman periods: bearded, semi-nude and supported on one side by a staff around which a serpent is coiled. This head probably comes from such a statue.

Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Black-figured plate, attributed to the painter Psiax
Greek
c.520-500 BCMade in Athens, Greece; from Vulci in Etruria (now in Lazio, Italy)
An archer blowing a trumpet
The archer on this plate wears a flapped and pointed cap, patterned trousers and a long-sleeved top. His costume is unusual, and is mostly Scythian in origin, as is the combined bow-case and quiver hanging from his waist. Scythian archers were employed as mercenaries in Athens from the mid-sixth century until 514 BC, when the Persian conquest of Thrace cut lines of communication and recruitment with Scythia. After this, Greek archers start to appear on vase paintings: they retain many elements of Scythian dress, but unlike the generally bearded Scythians, they are shown clean-shaven, as here. The trumpet this figure blows is thesalpinx, blown in battle.
This plate was painted by Psiax, who worked in both the conventional black-figure and the new red-figure techniques. The design, with the single black figure set on a plain clay background, looks like a translation into black-figure of a contemporary red-figure decorative scheme. Comparing it with a red-figure plate by the painter Epiktetos, which also shows a single archer, the opportunities offered by the newer technique are clear. The red-figure archer stands out more boldly against his black background; more varied and intricate patterns can be achieved because the details of his costume are painted rather than incised.
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Black-figured plate, attributed to the painter Psiax

Greek

c.520-500 BC
Made in Athens, Greece; from Vulci in Etruria (now in Lazio, Italy)

An archer blowing a trumpet

The archer on this plate wears a flapped and pointed cap, patterned trousers and a long-sleeved top. His costume is unusual, and is mostly Scythian in origin, as is the combined bow-case and quiver hanging from his waist. Scythian archers were employed as mercenaries in Athens from the mid-sixth century until 514 BC, when the Persian conquest of Thrace cut lines of communication and recruitment with Scythia. After this, Greek archers start to appear on vase paintings: they retain many elements of Scythian dress, but unlike the generally bearded Scythians, they are shown clean-shaven, as here. The trumpet this figure blows is thesalpinx, blown in battle.

This plate was painted by Psiax, who worked in both the conventional black-figure and the new red-figure techniques. The design, with the single black figure set on a plain clay background, looks like a translation into black-figure of a contemporary red-figure decorative scheme. Comparing it with a red-figure plate by the painter Epiktetos, which also shows a single archer, the opportunities offered by the newer technique are clear. The red-figure archer stands out more boldly against his black background; more varied and intricate patterns can be achieved because the details of his costume are painted rather than incised.

Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Stone panel from the North-West Palace of Ashurnasirpal II (Court D, no. 7)
Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern IraqNeo-Assyrian
c. 883-859 BC
This relief panel comes from the walls of the courtyard which led to the throne room of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). It was positioned next to a side-door through which his throne was sometimes visible.
Although many of the sculptures decorating the palace depicted magical spirits, away from the main central door and buttresses the scenes in the courtyard were secular. This scene was part of series showing a group of foreigners bringing tribute. Their dress shows that they were from the west. The turban suggests one man is from north-western Syria, his clenched fists are a token of submission. At this time Assyria was expanding westward to acquired booty and tribute from states in the geographical region of Syria. The man with monkeys may be Phoenician. They bring luxury goods and status symbols. The monkeys may have come from Egypt or from the lands of southern Arabia from which incense was imported.
Mesopotamian kings prided themselves in the collections of exotic animals they acquired as booty or tribute. Monkeys were popular animals in the art of Mesopotamia. They were often depicted playing musical instruments, perhaps representing animals accompanying travelling entertainers. 
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Stone panel from the North-West Palace of Ashurnasirpal II (Court D, no. 7)

Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern Iraq
Neo-Assyrian

c. 883-859 BC

This relief panel comes from the walls of the courtyard which led to the throne room of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). It was positioned next to a side-door through which his throne was sometimes visible.

Although many of the sculptures decorating the palace depicted magical spirits, away from the main central door and buttresses the scenes in the courtyard were secular. This scene was part of series showing a group of foreigners bringing tribute. Their dress shows that they were from the west. The turban suggests one man is from north-western Syria, his clenched fists are a token of submission. At this time Assyria was expanding westward to acquired booty and tribute from states in the geographical region of Syria. The man with monkeys may be Phoenician. They bring luxury goods and status symbols. The monkeys may have come from Egypt or from the lands of southern Arabia from which incense was imported.

Mesopotamian kings prided themselves in the collections of exotic animals they acquired as booty or tribute. Monkeys were popular animals in the art of Mesopotamia. They were often depicted playing musical instruments, perhaps representing animals accompanying travelling entertainers. 

Source: British Museum

(Source: k-a-t-a, via woodstockreborn)

foreverrikk:

just recorded a tutorial on different ways to wear this fabulous fabric that came in my June #theholbox! every June holBox has this fabric…I’m in love. | #dopechickslivingholistically #dclh #theholbox #natural #curlbox #boxbraids #protectivestyles #youtube #foreverrikk

foreverrikk:

just recorded a tutorial on different ways to wear this fabulous fabric that came in my June #theholbox! every June holBox has this fabric…I’m in love. | #dopechickslivingholistically #dclh #theholbox #natural #curlbox #boxbraids #protectivestyles #youtube #foreverrikk

(via afrodesiacworldwide)

(Source: bit.ly, via worth5dollars)

paintdeath:

Egon schiele

paintdeath:

Egon schiele

(via thewastedgeneration)